Learn iOS development with Craig Clayton’s course, book, and kaizen method

by Joey deVilla on March 17, 2017

Craig Clayton is one of the heroes in the Tampa tech scene. He organized and ran the Suncoast iOS Meetup here in Tampa as well as intensive iOS coding academies, and he makes a living writing mobile apps. If you’re a Patriots fan with an iPhone, chances are you’ve used his app. He’s been quite busy for the past little while, and if you’re interested in iOS development, you might be interested in what he’s up to…

On Saturday, April 1, Craig will be leading Swift 101: Getting Started, a full-day live online class where he’ll guide you through the process of building a Square Case-like iOS app, using iOS features such as Contacts, SiriKit, and TouchID. By the end of the session, you’ll have a better understanding of how to create apps for the latest version of iOS.

You won’t have to go anywhere to attend — it’ll be an online class taking place on Saturday, April 1, 2017, from 10:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m.. The course will cost US$50 to attend, plus a US$2 credit card processing fee. There’s a limited number of slots for the course, so reserve yours now!

For more information, see the Swift 101: Getting Started page.

If you’d like to get a better idea of what the course would be like — or if you’d like to supplement your iOS development studies — check out Craig’s book, iOS 10 Programming for Beginners. Like the upcoming online course, it’s aimed at beginners, but it’s full of material useful even to experienced iOS developers.

Most of the book, is devoted to building a single application: Let’s Eat, a restaurant review app that becomes more sophisticated and gains more features with each chapter. Each chapter begins with an explanation of the topics that will be covered, and features both clear explanations of those topics, along with step-by-step instructions for turning those topics into working code. Craig does an excellent job of explaining what he did with his code and why he did it. As you work on Let’s Eat, you’ll have built a professional-looking app that uses a number of iOS features, including GPS and maps, the camera, iPad multitasking, iMessage, and even 3D touch. When you’re done, you should be able to take the knowledge from working on the app and apply it to your own projects.

If you’re interested in the process behind the creation of Craig’s book, read his article, Using Kaizen to Improve as a Developer, in which he writes about adopting kaizen, the Japanese business philosophy of continuous improvement at all levels of an organization, in all areas.

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: