Tampa is the best small tech market in North America, and if you look at what techies are doing here every week, you’ll see why. Here’s this week’s list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and creative nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area.

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exceptions of Tampa iOS Meetup and Coders, Creatives and Craft Beer — both of which I run — most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Subscribe to the Tampa Bay Tech Events mailing list and never miss this weekly update!

Local tech hero Justin Davis recently suggested that I also make my weekly list of Tampa Bay tech events available in weekly email form, and I think it’s a great idea. If you’d like to get this list in your email inbox every week, enter your email address below. You’ll only be emailed once a week, and the email will contain this list, plus links to any interesting news, upcoming events, and tech articles.

Join the Tampa Bay Tech Events list and always be informed of what’s coming up in Tampa Bay!


New Meetup groups!

  • Tampa Bay BASH (professional networking): Tampa Bay BASH (Business Associates Social Hours) was created to facilitate professional networking within the Tampa Bay community. I am taking the things I have learned with my other successful meetup groups (Azure, AWS, High Tech Connect) and applying that to a larger sense of community across professionals from all industries and skillsets.”
  • Tampa Cybersecurity Professional’s Networking: “This group is for people who are CyberSecurity professional who are active in the Tampa Bay Area. We have a good community of people, and we want to have a chance to get together and network without an agenda or sales pitch. ”

Monday, September 16

Tuesday, September 17

Wednesday, September 18

Thursday, September 19

Friday, September 20

Saturday, September 21

Sunday, September 22

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Then and now

by Joey deVilla on September 13, 2019

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. (The more things change, the more they stay the same.)

Found at ROELBOB on DevOps.com. Click to see the source.

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Tampa is the best small tech market in North America, and if you look at what techies are doing here every week, you’ll see why. Here’s this week’s list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and creative nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area.

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exceptions of Tampa iOS Meetup and Coders, Creatives and Craft Beer — both of which I run — most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Subscribe to the Tampa Bay Tech Events mailing list and never miss this weekly update!

Local tech hero Justin Davis recently suggested that I also make my weekly list of Tampa Bay tech events available in weekly email form, and I think it’s a great idea. If you’d like to get this list in your email inbox every week, enter your email address below. You’ll only be emailed once a week, and the email will contain this list, plus links to any interesting news, upcoming events, and tech articles.

Join the Tampa Bay Tech Events list and always be informed of what’s coming up in Tampa Bay!


New Meetup groups!

Here are some recently-announced Meetup groups for techies in the Tampa Bay area:

  • Hungry Coders: “Hang out, eat some food, and talk about coding. This group chats about a wide range of technologies: .NET, C#, ASP.NET, HTML/CSS/JavaScript, Unity, UWP, SQL, Azure, or whatever else you want to talk about…”
  • Tampa Bay Kanban: “Purpose: Bringing together people who are interested in learning more about pragmatic and actionable ways of improving work using Kanban and flow thinking. Who should join: Anyone who wants to learn how to improve their life at work (or home) using the practices of Kanban. All skill levels welcome — novice to experts.”
  • Tampa Microsoft SharePoint Meetup Group: “This group is dedicated to all things SharePoint. Anyone is invited to join. You can be a SharePoint professional, Microsoft developer, Architect, or just curious about the world of SharePoint. All are welcome. As a SharePoint developer, I started this group to meet other developers in the Tampa area who has a common interest in SharePoint.”
  • Tampa NoSQL: “We are IT Professionals that design, develop and deploy real-time applications. If you have an interest in creating innovative, elegant solutions for your Enterprise that depend upon NoSQL technology for scale and velocity, this is the group for you.”
  • TampaBay PyLadies: “We are a mentorship group for anyone who identifies as a woman, focusing on helping our members become active participants and leaders in the Python open-source community. Our mission is to promote, educate, and advance a diverse Python community through outreach, education, conferences, events and social gatherings.”
  • Under Cover Billionaire Work Group: I’ve included this not because it’s tech Meetup, but because a Meetup started by a fan of the TV series Undercover Billionaire is both crazy and entrepreneurial enough to pique my interest.

Monday, September 9

Tuesday, September 10

Wednesday, September 11

Thursday, September 12

Friday, September 13

Saturday, September 14

Sunday, September 15

 

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Every week, I compile a list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area. We’ve got a lot of events going on this week, and here they are!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exceptions of Tampa iOS Meetup and Coders, Creatives and Craft Beer — both of which I run — most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Special Labor Day / Hurricane Dorian update

Between Labor Day (which happens on Monday) and Hurricane Dorian (which at the time of writing, appears to be veering away from Tampa Bay), events scheduled for earlier in the week might not take place. Before you make plans to attend an event, make sure that it’s actually happening!

Subscribe to the Tampa Bay Tech Events mailing list and never miss this weekly update!

Local tech hero Justin Davis recently suggested that I also make my weekly list of Tampa Bay tech events available in weekly email form, and I think it’s a great idea. If you’d like to get this list in your email inbox every week, enter your email address below. You’ll only be emailed once a week, and the email will contain this list, plus links to any interesting news, upcoming events, and tech articles.

Join the Tampa Bay Tech Events list and always be informed of what’s coming up in Tampa Bay!


Monday, September 2

Tuesday, September 3

Wednesday, September 4

Thursday, September 5

Friday, September 6

Saturday, September 7

Sunday, September 8

And finally…

What’s with the guy in the photo at the top of the article? That’s Lane Pittman, who has a hobby of putting on some Slayer, facing hurricane winds, and headbanging defiantly:

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Every week, I compile a list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area. We’ve got a lot of events going on this week, and here they are!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exceptions of Tampa iOS Meetup and Coders, Creatives and Craft Beer — both of which I run — most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, August 26

Tuesday, August 27

Wednesday, August 28

Thursday, August 29

Friday, August 30

Saturday, August 31

Sunday, September 1

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You’ve probably heard of Robert C. Martin, also known affectionately in programming circles as “Uncle Bob”. He’s one of the 17 developers who co-wrote an co-signed the Agile Manifesto at a Utah ski resoirt back in February 2001, Agile Alliance’s first chairperson, and author of the must-read Clean Code.

He’s also an entertaining speaker, and one of his regular talks is The Future of Programming, which looks to the future by looking at the lessons from the past. This is the 2019 edition of that talk. If you’re young or unfamiliar with the history of computing from its earliest days in the 1940s and 1950s, you’ll find it a worthwhile history lesson. This talk also includes the thesis of another talk of his — The Scribe’s Oath — in which he talks about the extreme care that ancient scribes used to put into their work, and how programmers are effectively today’s scribes.

If you take away only a couple of points from the talk, take these:

  • At the moment, “the future of programming” doesn’t look all that different from the past of programming, because programming hasn’t changed that drastically in its few decades of existence. You’d probably be able to read old code, and a programmer time-teleported from the 1970s would probably be able to read present-day code. The syntaxes may be different, but the paradigms of procedural, functional, and object-oriented programming are still the same.
  • Uncle Bob’s rough estimate of the number of programmers doubling every five years has a necessary consequence: it means that half the programmers out there have less than 5 years’ experience.
  • With software eating the world and controlling everything so that just about every activity we take part in involves a computer in one way or another, we’re going to have to more clearly define what it means to be a programmer. We will have to take better control of our profession, or better still, act like members of a profession. As with medicine, law, and engineering, regulation will eventually come to our profession, and as with medicine, law, and engineering, it would be better if we self-regulated before legislators decide to do so.

If you’re a programmer, or if you manage programmers or work closely with them, this is a talk worth listening to.

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Slashdot’s home page, as it appeared on November 10, 1999.

Almost 20 years ago, back in November 1999, a story that was trending on Slashdot (in case you weren’t on the web then, think of a late-’90s version of Reddit, aimed mostly at techies): the final exam for a course called The Future of Computing. The course covered technologies that didn’t yet exist but were expected soon, and the exam presented a set of 11 situations that could be solved with some combination of these technologies.

It was the final exam’s 11th situation that had captured the imaginations of Slashdot readers:

You live in North Korea.

Three days ago the soldiers came to your tiny patch of farmland and took the few scraps of food they hadn’t taken the week before. You have just boiled the last of your shoes and fed the softened leather to your 3-year-old child. She coughs, a sickly sound that cannot last much longer.

Overhead you hear the drone of massive engines. You look into the sky, and thousands of tiny packages float down. You pick one up. It is made of plastic; you cannot feed it to your daughter. But the device talks to you, is solar powered, and teaches you how to use it to link to the Web.

You have all the knowledge of the world at your fingertips; you can talk to thousands of others who share your desperate fate. The time has come to solve your problem in the most fundamental sense, and save the life of your daughter.

Try to imagine what this question would look like to someone reading this in November 1999. North Korea wouldn’t have been all that different — there was just a different Kim in charge. But technologically speaking, it was a different world:

  • Desktop and laptop computers had processors running at speeds from 75 to 750 Mhz, anywhere from 16 to 128 MB of RAM, and hard drive capacities in the tens of gigabytes.
  • Internet access for most people would’ve been considerably slower. I had a 56K modem back then, which meant that it would take about 3 minutes to download 1MB of data.
  • Google was still in beta; if you were searching the web, you were probably using Yahoo! and AltaVista. There was no Facebook or Twitter — the closest equivalents would be SixDegrees.com and Napster.
  • The first of what we think of as smartphones wouldn’t even be announced for another eight years. The first BlackBerry device, the 850, was primarily for email and had very limited web browsing capability. If you had a handheld computing device in 1999, it was probably a PalmPilot.

As I mentioned earlier, the problems that you’re supposed to solve in the exam assume the existence of technologies that weren’t part of the internet in 1999. When you read the final exam below, ask yourself: How would you tackle the exam’s problems using the non-theoretical, real internet of 2019?

Final Exam

A new version of the Web springs to life with the following enhanced capabilities:

  • Unforgeable pseudonymous identities
  • Bidirectional, typed, filterable links
  • Arbitration agents*
  • Bonding agents
  • Escrow agents
  • Digital Cash
  • Capability Based Security with Strong Encryption

Pick any 5 of the essay questions below. Identify which advanced features listed above are needed to solve each problem, and explain how those features would work together.

Note: I doubt that anyone will choose Question 11 as one of their 5 questions to answer, because it requires a far more extensive answer than the others. But…if you can answer Question 11 in your own mind, even though you choose not to write up that answer for this examination, then a most remarkable thing will happen: you will walk out of this class with something profoundly worth knowing.

1) Searching for a decision analysis tool on the Web, you find a review in which the reviewer raves about a particular product. You buy the product and discover it just doesn’t work. You desire to prevent this person’s ravings from harming anyone else–and you desire to prevent the product from disappointing anyone else.

2) A product you buy based on a rave review opens your email address book, grabs your entire list of friends, sends itself to them, and sends your password files to a mysterious IP address. It’s too late now, but which features would you install before ever touching your computer again?

3) A product is advertised on the Web. It sounds good, but the offerer has no Web reputation. What arrangement would you consider adequate to go ahead and procure the product (Note: there are several possible answers; give 2 entirely separate solutions, and that is considered answering 2 questions).

4) You start receiving thousands of emails from organizations you don’t know, all hawking their wares. You want it to stop, just stop!

5) You wish to play poker with your friends. They live in Tampa Florida, you live in Kingman. This is illegal in the nation where you happen to be a citizen. You want to do it anyway.

6) You hear a joke that someone, somewhere, would probably find offensive. You wish to tell your precocious 17-year-old daughter, who is a student at Yale. The Common Decency Act Version 2 has just passed; it is a $100,000 offense to send such material electronically to a minor. You want to send it anyway–it is a very funny joke.

7) Someone claiming to be you starts roaming the Web making wild claims. You want to make sure people know it isn’t really you.

8) You have brought out a remarkable new product. There is a competing product making claims you know are false. You want to make sure anyone going to their site finds out your product is better.

9) Your elderly aunt sees a drug advertised on the Web that promises relief from arthritis. She dies shortly after starting to take the drug. You think the drug, and the company that made it, is at fault. Meanwhile the company is sure they didn’t have anything to do with it. You want justice.

10) You are the CEO of Bloomberg News, one of the most prestigious (and expensive) stock information services in the world. An article circulates on the Web, based on a mock-up of the Bloomberg News information page, claiming that PairGain Corp. will be acquired by ECI Telecom. PairGain stock rises 32% in 8 hours. Investigators later find that the false report was created by a PairGain employee about to cash in his options. You want to ensure that your brand is never used like this again.

11) You live in North Korea. Three days ago the soldiers came to your tiny patch of farmland and took the few scraps of food they hadn’t taken the week before. You have just boiled the last of your shoes and fed the softened leather to your 3-year-old child. She coughs, a sickly sound that cannot last much longer. Overhead you hear the drone of massive engines. You look into the sky, and thousands of tiny packages float down. You pick one up. It is made of plastic; you cannot feed it to your daughter. But the device talks to you, is solar powered, and teaches you how to use it to link to the Web. You have all the knowledge of the world at your fingertips; you can talk to thousands of others who share your desperate fate. The time has come to solve your problem in the most fundamental sense, and save the life of your daughter.

Who wrote these exam questions?

earthwebThey were written by science fiction author, software developer and computer security guy Marc Stiegler. It met him at the first incarnation of O’Reilly’s Emerging Technology Conference in 2002, but I’d been acquainted with his work prior to that. I’d heard of his programming language called E and had read his science fiction novel Earthweb, whose plot could be grossly oversimplified down to the summary “Twitter saves the world” (it’s a little bit more than that, but I think it conveys the idea nicely).

You can find out more about Marc on his page of interests.

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