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Every week, I compile a list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area. We’ve got a lot of events going on this week, and here they are!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exception of Tampa iOS Meetup, which I run, most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, March 18

Tuesday, March 19

Wednesday, March 20

Thursday, March 21

Friday, March 22

Saturday, March 23

Sunday, March 24

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Every week, I compile a list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area. We’ve got a lot of events going on this week, and here they are!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exception of Tampa iOS Meetup, which I run, most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, March 11

Tuesday, March 12

Wednesday, March 13

Thursday, March 14

Friday, March 15

Saturday, March 16

Sunday, March 17

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Every week, I compile a list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area. We’ve got a lot of events going on this week, and here they are!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exception of Tampa iOS Meetup, which I run, most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, March 4

Tuesday, March 5

Wednesday, March 6

Thursday, March 7

Friday, March 8

Saturday, March 9

Sunday, March 10

 

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Every week, I compile a list of events for developers, technologists, tech entrepreneurs, and nerds in and around the Tampa Bay area. We’ve got a lot of events going on this week, and here they are!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exception of Tampa iOS Meetup, which I run, most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, February 25

Tuesday, February 26

Wednesday, February 27

Thursday, February 28

Friday, March 1

Saturday, March 2

Sunday, March 3

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Click the photo to see it at full size.

Pictured above: Josh Burke explaining a few of functional programming’s cornerstones at Burlington Code Academy, using a graphic I made a couple of years ago…

It’s based on a tweet by Steven Luscher:

The graphic got to this class by way of Googler Addy Osmani, who was contacted by Burlington Code Academy co-founder Alex Chaffee about using it in a class. Addy pointed Alex to me and Steven, and we both gladly gave our permission — although really, it’s Steven’s creation; I just turned it into a graphic.

Here’s the Alex’s tweet of the graphic in their class:

I didn’t want to stop at just making a graphic based on Steven Luscher’s tweet — I wanted to build on it by making it real! So I implemented these emoji functions in Swift…

…and they’re in a Swift playground, which you can copy from this Gist or download here.

My thanks to Steven Luscher for starting the whole thing, Addy Osmani for helping make the connections, and Alex Chaffee and Josh Burke for using the graphic! I’d also like to thank everyone involved for helping to make map, filter, and reduce easier to understand for new programmers — they can be strange concepts at first.

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For those of you who enjoyed “Conference call bingo” from yesterday’s collection of links, here it is, rendered as a bingo card from days gone by. Looking at it, you can almost smell the cigarette smoke!

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Global Nerdy link backlog (February 18, 2019 edition)

by Joey deVilla on February 17, 2019

Over the past few years, I’ve managed to accumulate a ridiculously large backlog of links that I’d been meaning to blog about here on Global Nerdy. It’s time for me to do some spring cleaning, so from time to time, you’ll see these posts where I unload the links that are still good, both in the sense of still being online and still being valid and useful. Enjoy!

You may also want to see this earlier collection of links.

Things I Was Unprepared For As A Lead Developer (September 7, 2017)

Here’s Pascal de Vink at WebCamp Zagreb (2017) talking about the non-coding things that a lead developer does: delegating, culture building, mentoring, planning, meetings, dealing with upper management, and more.

On company culture

  • It’s not an asshole problem — it’s a bystander problem (December 31, 2014): Cate Huston writes that the real problem that women in tech face isn’t the assholes, but the bystanders, who allow the assholes to continue with their ways.
  • Ten unmistakable signs of a fear-based workplace (March 7, 2017): If you haven’t worked at a place where management practices rule by fear, consider yourself fortunate! Here’s how you spot these places before you get trapped in one — go and read the full article, but here’s my quick summary of those 10 signs:
    1. Everyone’s focused only on their immediate goals.
    2. Managers and HR specialize in assigning work, measuring results, punishing infractions and maintaining order.
    3. People are afraid to tell the truth because they already know no one wants to hear it.
    4. All people talk about is who’s in management’s “good books” and “bad books”.
    5. Employees wonder if they’ll have a job next week.
    6. Following rules and avoiding blame are top priorities.
    7. Managers pay lip service to collaboration and out-of-the-box thinking, but no one takes them seriously.
    8. Employees disappear without warning.
    9. It’s not the smartest and most capable employees who get promoted — it’s the ones who most wholeheartedly embrace the fear-based culture.
    10. No humor or humanity.
  • In 2017, your internal culture is your brand (August 7, 2017): Written not long after James “Google Manifestbro” Damore wrote his terrible (and justifiably career-limiting) screed, this article explains that a company’s culture is now the story it tells about itself to the outside world.

The software developer’s sketchbook (January 1, 2015)

James Hague suggests that one of the problems with working on a few big projects is that this approach limits your expertise: “Someone who does roof work on fifty houses a year looks a lot more the expert than someone who needs two years to ship a single software project.”

To counter this, he suggests that developers could start building up a sketchbook, the way artists and crafters do:

This sketchbook of implemented ideas isn’t a paper book, but a collection of small programs. It could be as simple as a folder full of Python scripts or Erlang modules. It’s not about being right or wrong; many ideas won’t work out, and you’ll learn from them. It’s about exploring your interests on a smaller scale. It’s about playing with code. It’s about having fun. And you might just become an expert in the process.

The Programming Talent Myth (April 12, 2015)

In his keybote at PyCon 2015, Django co-creator and Heroku Director of Platform Security Jacob Kaplan-Moss describes himself as “At best, an average developer”. He talks about the myth of the “10x programmer” and how the dichotomy between the rock star programmer and the “average” developer is a false one.

Also worth checking out:

The Myth of the Genius Programmer (Google I/O 2009):

Conference call bingo (September 19, 2017)

Found via Amy Wilson:

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