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Programming

Friday 5: Useful things for coders (April 2, 2021 edition)

Every Friday, I publish the Friday 5, a list of 5 links to useful things for coders.

In this week’s Friday 5: a closer look at JavaScript’s ternary operator, JSON’s interop vulnerabilities, a free Python course on Udemy, reading, editing, and erasing Exif metadata from photos, and questioning a specific kind of interview question.

Rethinking the JavaScript Ternary Operator

JavaScript’s version of the ternary operator — ?:, also known as the “conditional operator”, is examined very thoroughly in this article. It goes beyond the standard “avoid it; it makes your code hard to read” advice, and shows cases where it does make your code easier to read, reason about, and maintain.

Check it out: Rethinking the JavaScript Ternary Operator

An Exploration of JSON Interoperability Vulnerabilities

TL;DR: The same JSON document can be parsed with different values across microservices, leading to a variety of potential security risks. If you prefer a hands-on approach, try the labs and when they scare you, come back and read on.”

Check it out: An Exploration of JSON Interoperability Vulnerabilities

Get the Automate the Boring Stuff with Python course for free!

For a limited time only — that is, until Sunday, April 4, you can get the Udemy course based on the book Automate the Boring Stuff with Python for free! The book, and hence the course, is quite good; in fact, I used it as one of the texts for the Python courses I taught last year. Just click the link above or use the coupon code APR2021FREE at checkout.

Check it out: The Automate the Boring Stuff with Python course on Udemy — for free!

JavaScript and Photos: Read, Edit, and Erase Location and Other Exif Metadata

I’ll admit it — this article’s mine; I wrote it for work. It covers the use of the Piexifjs JavaScript library to read, edit, and erase the Exif metadata in digital photos.

Check it out: JavaScript and Photos: Read, Edit, and Erase Location and Other Exif Metadata

Why do interviewers ask linked list questions?

It doesn’t happen often in interviews for front-end developers, but I have been asked linked list questions in interviews for native mobile and back-end positions. Mind you, I haven’t actually needed to build a linked list for anything work-related — ever. So why do interviewers ask linked list questions?

Check it out: Why do interviewers ask linked list questions?

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