November 2019

Poster: Designing for accessibility

If you’re designing applications with user interfaces, you might want to check out these posters from the UK Home Office on Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility. These posters were designed by Karwai Pun, who works with an accessibility group at Home Office Digital to make existing and new services better for the Home Office’s users. She created these “dos and don’ts” posters as a way of approaching accessibility from a design perspective.

These posters cover designing for users with various needs:

  • Designing for users on the autistic spectrum
  • Designing for users of screen readers
  • Designing for users who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • Designing for users with physical or motor disabilities
  • Designing for users with low vision
  • Designing for users with dyslexia
  • Designing for users with anxiety

To find out more, see the UK Home Office’s Dos and don’ts on designing for accessibility page.

Designing for users on the autistic spectrum

UK Home Office poster: Designing for users on the autistic spectrum

  • Use simple colors. Don’t use bright contrasting colors.
  • Write in plain language. Don’t use figures of speech and idioms.
  • Use simple sentences and bullets. Don’t create a wall of text.
  • Make buttons descriptive. Don’t make buttons vague and unpredictable.
  • Build simple and consistent layouts. Don’t build complex and cluttered layouts.

Designing for users of screen readers

UK Home Office poster: Designing for users of screen readers

  • Describe images and provide transcripts for video. Don’t only show information in an image or video.
  • Follow a linear logical layout. Don’t spread content all over a page.
  • Structure content using HTML5. Don’t rely on text size and placement for structure.
  • Build for keyboard use only. Don’t force mouse or screen use.
  • Write descriptive links and headings. Don’t write uninformative links and headings.

Designing for users who are deaf or hard of hearing

UK Home Office poster: Designing for users who are deaf or hard of hearing

  • Write in plain language. Don’t use complicated words or figures of speech.
  • Use subtitles or provide transcripts for videos. Don’t put content in audio or video only.
  • Use a linear, logical layout. Don’t make complex layouts and menus.
  • Break up content with sub-headings, images, and videos. Don’t make users read long blocks of text.
  • Let users ask for preferred communication support when booking appointments. Don’t make telephone the only means of contact for users.

Designing for users with physical or motor disabilities

UK

  • Make large clickable actions. Don’t demand precision.
  • Give clickable elements space. Don’t bunch interactions together.
  • Design for keyboard or speech only use. Don’t make dynamic content that requires a lot of mouse movement.
  • Design with mobile and touchscreen in mind. Don’t have short time-out windows.
  • Provide shortcuts. Don’t tire users with lots of typing and scrolling.

Designing for users with low vision

  • Use good color contrasts and a readable font size. Don’t use low color contrasts and small font size.
  • Publish all information on web pages. Don’t bury information in downloads.
  • Use a combination of color, shapes, and text. Don’t only use color to convey meaning.
  • Follow a linear, logical layout. Don’t spread content all over a page.
  • Put buttons and notifications in context. Don’t separate actions from their context.

Designing for users with dyslexia

  • Use images and diagrams to support text. Don’t use large blocks of heavy text.
  • Align text to the left and keep a consistent layout. Don’t underline words, use italics, or write in capitals.
  • Consider producing materials in other formats (for example, audio or video). Don’t force users to remember things from previous pages — give reminders and prompts.
  • Keep content short, clear, and simple. Don’t rely on accurate spelling — use autocorrect or provide suggestions.
  • Let users change the contrast between background and text. Don’t put too much information in one place.

Designing for users with anxiety

  • Give users enough time to complete an action. Don’t rush users or set impractical time limits.
  • Explain what will happen after completing a service. Don’t leave users confused about next steps or timeframes.
  • Make important information clear. Don’t leave users uncertain about the consequences of their actions.
  • Give users the support they need to complete a service. Don’t make support of help hard to access.
  • Let users check their answers before they submit them. Don’t leave users questioning what answers they gave.

Found via Ramon Grajo.

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Technology accounts for 10.4% of Tampa Bay’s economy, and that’s why our tech scene is so lively!

Every week, dedicated individuals and organizations in around the Tampa Bay do more than just their “day jobs”. They get involved in events where they share their knowledge, make connections and friends, and gather together to build strong tech, entrepreneur, and nerd communities. That’s why I do this every week: I put together a list of tech, entrepreneur, and nerd events to make sure that they can be found and you can attend them!

Here’s what’s happening in Tampa Bay this week!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exceptions of Tampa iOS Meetup and Coders, Creatives and Craft Beer — both of which I run — most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, November 11

Tuesday, November 12

Wednesday, November 13

Thursday, November 14

Friday, November 15

Saturday, November 16

Sunday, November 17

Do you have an upcoming event that you’d like to see on this list?

If you know of an upcoming event that you think should appear on this list, please let me know!

Join the mailing list!

If you’d like to get this list in your email inbox every week, enter your email address below. You’ll only be emailed once a week, and the email will contain this list, plus links to any interesting news, upcoming events, and tech articles.

Join the Tampa Bay Tech Events list and always be informed of what’s coming up in Tampa Bay!


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Whether you’re new to Kotlin or bounce between so many languages that you need a quick reference (like me), I think you’ll find the Kotlin Cheat Sheet and Quick Reference at RayWenderlich.com handy! It covers the syntax that you’re most likely to use in day-to-day Kotlin development using clear — and in some cases, amusing — examples to help explain how to use various Kotlin features.

This is a revised edition: same content, improved layout. Best of all, you don’t have to be a RayWenderlich.com subscriber to get your hands on it. Check it out!

If you’d like to learn more about Kotlin and Android programming, be sure to check out RayWenderlich.com’s books, Kotlin Apprentice and Android Apprentice, two fantastic introductory books to the Kotlin programming language and Android development with Kotlin!

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Click the comic to see it at full size.

Why should Facebook and their ilk make all the money off my data? I want in on some of that action!

Want to see more of Jeremy Nguyen’s work? See his site, JeremyWinsLife.com!

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Beginning ARKit

by Joey deVilla on November 4, 2019

Want to learn to how write augmented reality apps for iOS devices? Check out Beginning ARKit, my video tutorial on RayWenderlich.com, the premier mobile tutorial site!

In the tutorial, you’ll build the following apps while learning the fundamentals of developing apps using ARKit, the augmented reality development framework for iOS:

  1. Hello, Augmented World! A quick “Hello, World!” app to get your AR programming feet wet.
  2. Happy AR Painter. An app that lets you “paint” over the real world with 3-D objects.
  3. Raykea. Here’s a scaled-down version of “IKEA Place” — it lets you put virtual furniture into the room you’re in, and automatically adds posters to the wall.
  4. BaedekAR. A AR museum guide that identifies known works of 2-D art, draws their titles over them in AR text, which you can tap to find out more.
  5. BaedekAR 3D. A 3D version of BaedekAR, which identifies known 3-D objects.

Want a taste? Here are some excerpts…

If this sounds like your kind of tutorial, check out the full thing at RayWenderlich.com!

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Tampa is the best small tech market in North America, and if you look at what techies are doing here — largely in their spare time, week after week — you’ll see why. They’re getting together, sharing their knowledge, exchanging ideas, hatching plans, helping each other, making friends, and building a community.

Here’s what’s happening in Tampa Bay this week!

This weekly list is posted as a voluntary service to the Tampa tech community. With the notable exceptions of Tampa iOS Meetup and Coders, Creatives and Craft Beer — both of which I run — most of this information comes from Meetup.com, EventBrite, and other local event announcement sites. I can’t guarantee the accuracy of the dates and times listed here; if you want to be absolutely sure that the event you’re interested in is actually taking place, please contact the organizers!

Monday, November 4

On Monday, the coworking space Catapult Lakeland will host FUNDamentals: The Joinery Founders Jon and Sarah Bucklew. It’ll feature Jon and Sarah Bucklew, founders of Seventeen20, a handcrafted, industrial modern furniture design company, and The Joinery, a food hall, and craft brewery, and they’ll talk about one of the most difficult startup tasks: securing funding.

Tuesday, November 5

Hey, programmers! On Tuesday night, there are a couple of “What’s new” presentations that you might be interested in: C# 8 is here, what’s new? in St. Pete, and What’s new in Laravel 6 (the PHP framework) in Tampa.

Wednesday, November 6

The upcoming Tampa Bay Scrum Masters Guild meetup will feature Fred Mastropasqua presenting Scrum@Scale, created by Jeff Sutherland (one of the signatories of the Agile Manifesto and one of the creators of the Scrum development process) and described as “A framework within which networks of Scrum teams operating consistently with the Scrum Guide can address complex adaptive problems, while creatively delivering products of the highest possible value.”

Thursday, November 7

Disrupt the Bay bills itself as “a health tech conference with a cause,” that cause being pediatric cancer. It will feature a number of panels including one for healthcare leadership, a health tech mentoring panel featuring Dr. Richard Munassi of Tampa Bay Wave and Brian Kornfeld of Synapse Florida, a keynote by Jay Samit, author of Disrupt You!, and a VIP reception.

Friday, November 7

The Lean Coffee premise is simple: build better agile communities by holding structured, collaboratively-steerd agile discussions of Agile over coffee — and nice and early, so that you can still get to work on time! There are two happening in the area on Friday — one in Tampa, and the other in St. Pete.

Saturday, November 8

Sunday, November 9

Join the mailing list!

If you’d like to get this list in your email inbox every week, enter your email address below. You’ll only be emailed once a week, and the email will contain this list, plus links to any interesting news, upcoming events, and tech articles.

Join the Tampa Bay Tech Events list and always be informed of what’s coming up in Tampa Bay!


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Chris Hallbeck’s motivational trick

by Joey deVilla on November 1, 2019

Chris Hallbeck’s “Avoiding” comic.

Click the comic to see its source.

If you need motivation to work on a project that you’ve been putting off for a long time, or are hamstrung with regret about putting it off for so long, Chris Hallbeck’s time-travel motivational trick might be just what you need. Who among us hasn’t wanted to go back in time at least once for a do-over?

Thanks to Peach Flambée for the find!

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