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Mobile Programming Video What I’m Up To

How to add Auth0 authentication to a SwiftUI app

Joey deVilla in his home office, holding an “Einstein” rubber duck up to the camera.
C’mon, how many programming tutorial videos have a scene like this?

If you’re making an iOS app, the odds are pretty good that sooner or later, you’re going to have to integrate authentication — login and logout — into it. I show you how to do that with Auth0 in both a video

…as well as a matching two-part article series that walks you through the process:

Both the video and article present how the final app will look and work:

Tap to view at full size.

And then they’ll get you started with a starter project:

Joey deVilla appears in the corner of the screen showing the starter project of Auth0’s iOS/SwiftUI authentication video.
Tap to view at full size.

I’ll walk you through the processes of getting Auth0 set up to recognize your app and creating a user with which to log in:

Joey deVilla appears in the corner of the screen showing the Auth0 dashboard in Auth0’s iOS/SwiftUI authentication video.
Tap to view at full size.

And then, I’ll show you how to add login and logout to the project’s app:

Joey deVilla appears in the corner of the screen, while adding login and logout to the starter project of Auth0’s iOS/SwiftUI authentication video.
Tap to view at full size.

And along the way, I’ll provide a brief intro to ID tokens, JWTs, and JWT.io:

Joey deVilla appears in the corner of the screen showing the JWT.io site in  Auth0’s iOS/SwiftUI authentication video.
Tap to view at full size.

Of course the video ends with an accordion number!

Joey deVilla plays accordion at the end of an Auth0 tutorial video.
Again, I ask: how many programming tutorial videos have a scene like this?

Once again, the here’s the video, How to Integrate Auth0 in a SwiftUI App, and here are the articles:

Whether you prefer to learn by watching video, reading, or a little bit of both, I hope you find these useful!

Categories
Programming Reading Material

My tutorial on iOS authentication using SwiftUI and Auth0

Banner: Get Started with iOS Authentication using SwiftUI

Hey, iOS developers! My latest tutorial article on the Auth0 blog shows you how to easily add authentication (that is, login and logout) to SwiftUI apps and display information from their user profile.

The article demonstrates the most basic use of the Auth0.swift SDK, the Auth0 SDK for all Apple platforms — not just iOS, but macOS, iPadOS, watchOS, and tvOS. It’s Auth0’s third most-used SDKs, accounting for more than one in ten API requests to Auth0 systems!

It’s a two-part tutorial. Part 1 of the tutorial starts with File → New Project…, adds some basic interactivity, adds the Auth0.swift package, walks you through setup on the Auth0 side, and finally enables login and logout:

iOS Simulator screen shot: Screen with title “SwiftUI Login Demo” and “Log in” button.
The app’s “logged out” screen.
iOS Simulator screen shot: Auth0 Universal Login screen.
Auth0’s Universal Login.
iOS Simulator screen shot: Screen with title “Logged in” and “Log out” button.
The app’s “logged in” screen.

Part 2 of the tutorial takes your basic login/logout app and gives it the ability to read user information from the user profile and display it onscreen:

iOS Simulator screen shot: Screen with title “Logged in”, photo of user, user]s name and email address, and “Log out” button.
The revised “logged in” screen.
Categories
Programming

Xcode 13 beta is available now!

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The first day of WWDC ’21 has come and gone, which means that the beta for the upcoming version of Xcode is available now!

If you’ve been itching to try out the new Xcode (and especially the new SwiftUI), you can get it at Apple’s Developer site’s Downloads page. It’s currently installing on my machine as I write this.

Let’s do this.

Just a quick warning if this is your first time working with Xcode: the installation process can take a while. On my Auth0-issued 2019 MacBook Pro (2.6 GHz 6-core i7, 16 GB RAM), it took about a half hour or so to unzip itself into a functioning application.